Parental Engagement

 
We have spoken with thousands of teachers across the country. Whether they teach in public or private schools, urban or rural schools, secular or religious schools—teachers overwhelmingly agree that one of the most important elements to helping their students learn is parental engagement. Students who don’t have support at home are statistically much more likely to struggle with learning.
 
NWEF believes that parental engagement is critical to the education of students—not only to provide support and perspective on what they are being taught, but also to oversee what they are learning and to protect them as a primary caregiver, advocate, and instructor.
 

Consider the following statements about NWEF's approach to the role of parents in education:

  • Parental engagement is one of the most important factors in a child’s educational development.
  • The family is the foundational unit in every society.
  • Parents have primary responsibility for their children, especially in matters of safety, provision, character formation, and education.
  • Engaged parents are usually best qualified to make decisions regarding their children’s education.
  • Parents should research and determine the best educational opportunities available to their children.
  • Providing the best educational opportunities for students always requires the sacrifice of parents.
  • Parents should never surrender their rights or responsibilities to the state—unless they are proven dangerous or delinquent.
  • Parents have the right to hold the government accountable for its engagement in education and insist that their interests are served.
Evidence makes it clear that parental involvement matters in education. That's why NWEF chooses to include, challenge, and empower parents by focusing on the parental role as one of our five core principles. 

Parental Engagement

Vision & Mission

 
Our Vision:
To change education and culture through foundational principles and sound policy.

Our Mission:
To educate and collaborate with individuals and organizations to tell the story of America’s education and culture, identify foundational principles that improve it, and advance practice and policy to change it.